michaelericbrown.com

Posts Tagged ‘genisys

The Terminator Franchise

I should first admit that I think that not only is Terminator 2: Judgment Day the best sequel of all time (yes, even edging out Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back), it’s also one of the best movies of all time, period.  In addition to incredible action, effects, and pacing, the movie manages to deliver an important message about human nature and our propensity towards violence and self destruction.  The final line is so powerful that I’ll never forget it.  Sarah Connor narrates over an empty road during the night: “The unknown future rolls toward us.  I face it, for the first time, with a sense of hope.  Because if a machine, a Terminator, can learn the value of human life, maybe we can too.”

This film delivers on the promise from the first movie, when Kyle Reese repeats the words John Connor made him memorize to Sarah: “Thank you, Sarah, for your courage through the dark years.  I can’t help you with what you must soon face, except to say that the future is not set.  There is no fate but what we make for ourselves.  You must be stronger than you imagine you can be.  You must survive, or I will never exist.”  Indeed, the transformation of Sarah Connor from the first film to the sequel is staggering — she goes from a naive and gentle waitress in The Terminator to a hardened and violent soldier in Terminator 2: Judgment Day.  Linda Hamilton’s performances in both films are incomparable.  The best part is that they do indeed change the course of history that night at Cyberdyne Systems, one in which their Terminator stands as an unstoppable force against law enforcement in what can only be described as a preview of the apocalypse they’re trying to prevent.  Poignantly, no fate.

This second film is the perfect ending to the franchise.  There is zero need to go any further, but given the nature of how Hollywood works as a profit-driven enterprise, more sequels were inevitable.  As such, we were given what I consider one of the most offensive followups in cinematic history: Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines.  Not because the film was all that bad: truly, most of it was enjoyable, in the mindless action movie sense.  But because of the ending when it’s revealed that Judgment Day is inevitable after all, that everything that has come before was all for naught.  The central tenant of James Cameron’s two films was discarded all for the sake of generating more sequels — which he had no part of, I should point out.

Terminator: Salvation was a confusing mess, so much so that I barely remember it.  The post-Judgment Day world that is shown in this film is radically different from the portrayals in the James Cameron entries.  As such, I can’t even consider it canon (for whatever that means at this point), since the most recent Terminator: Genisys seems to ignore this as well.

Speaking of, I went to see Genisys yesterday, and just like Rise of the Machines, I felt like this was a completely enjoyable action flick.  Unlike Rise of the Machines, however, Genisys avoided throwing a giant middle finger at the No Fate thread from the original films, at least.  Nevertheless, this film’s overarching plot and how it fits in with the timeline is bizarre and borderline non-sensical.  Even so, I appreciate that this movie essentially establishes that it’s in its own parallel timeline, which at least affords it the possibility of taking the franchise into another direction without denigrating the Cameron ones.

Genisys shows us parts from The Terminator, but turned on its head because of the timeline changes.  Instead of the Sarah Connor who was blissfully naive at the beginning, Kyle Reese discovers one who is already trained and ready for the oncoming apocalypse.  But the strangeness of this version of Sarah is that, unlike Linda Hamilton’s Judgment Day incarnation, Emilia Clarke’s rendition is has much softer edges.  In a way, I’m fine with this, but on the other hand, I feel like the writers decided to make her more likable to modern audiences.  The tough plus sweet combination is a strange one for the Sarah Connor I know.

Similarly, Kyle Reese is quite different this time around, except that it makes less sense because he’s still supposed to be the same incarnation as Michael Biehn’s version.  And while Jai Courtney does fine work in his portrayal of this version of Reese, I feel strongly that his is considerably weaker.  Considerably safer.  What I mean by that is that Biehn played an emotionally shredded Kyle Reese who had seen nothing but nonstop horror and death in his life, and bore all kinds of scars both literally and figuratively.  This was a man with severe PTSD who feels wildly out of place when he travels to pre-Judgment Day 1984.  You can completely understand why such a disaffected person would fall in love with a photograph of Sarah Connor, this idyllic beauty that looked like she lived on another world.  The fantasy of her ran deeper for Kyle than we could comprehend.

Conversely, Jai Courtney’s Kyle Reese is shown to be more gallant, more emotionally stable.  He comes off like a more generic expression of what a solider should be, as is often the case in contemporary action movies, as opposed to what one can become after decades of agony.  The juxtaposition between Courtney’s Reese and Clarke’s Connor is more an awkward blind date than what Biehn and Hamilton had, which was more visceral and mutually dependent.

After thinking about this, I realized what my preference for a sequel would have been for the Cameron movies.  Rather than mess around with the idea that somehow the actions of Sarah, the Terminator, young John, and Miles accounted for nothing, I would rather have seen a film that follows up with the war-hero John Connor’s time after he sends back the two guardians to protect his mother and younger self.  Instead, I would go with the Back to the Future 2 idea of time travel with split timelines (alternate realities).  While Judgment Day was averted, the time that older John Connor lives in continues, its own world.

In this still post-Judgment Day world, I would portray the battle against the forces of Skynet as still continuing.  While the resistance managed to destroy its central core, all the machines it had created are still functioning, still obeying their directives.  Perhaps, like bees, the machines will designate a new queen, and a new AI, born without human design, to emerge and present a wholly new kind of threat.

Advertisements

Written by Michael

7 July 2015 at 1:54 pm